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January 2015 Web Exclusive:
 
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Illustration by Froylan Garcia
 

White and Black people in this country have similar rates of illegal drug use, but research shows that Black parents come to the attention of the child welfare system for drug use at far higher rates. One 1990 Florida study found that doctors were 10 times more likely to report Black women for drug use during pregnancy than White women. A more recent study, conducted between 2001 and 2007 in California, found that Black women were four times more likely to be reported.>>>Read More

 
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Jeffrey Mays with his family.
 

Child welfare came into my life in 2000. At the time, I was married with three children, ages 14, 11 and a newborn. I was also an addict.>>>Read More

 
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Rise Issue #27 Fall 2014
Facing Race in Child Welfare

Children of color—especially Black and Native American children—enter foster care at higher rates than White children and stay in care longer. Research in some places has found that, even when cases are similar, families of color are treated differently than White families.

Change is possible when child welfare systems, parents and communities confront race in child welfare and take action. This issue explores parents’ perspectives and roles in reform.>>>Read More

 
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