Posts By: Keyna Franklin

‘Our Leadership is an Extension of Our Values’: Getting to Know Rise Co-Executive Directors Jeanette Vega Brown and Bianca Shaw

In April, the Rise Advisory Board announced that it selected Jeanette Vega Brown and Bianca Shaw as the next leadership of Rise. Here, Jeanette Vega Brown and Bianca Shaw, now co-executive directors of Rise, tell us about who they are, how they got involved in the parent-led movement for family justice, their roles and vision for the organization and what is staying the same at Rise. They also discuss why it is meaningful for Rise to be led by two women of color, including a parent impacted by ACS.

‘Peer Support is Fundamental to Keeping Families Together’

In honor of National Reunification Month, Lindsay Reilly, a parent impacted by the family policing system, discusses her experiences with peer support both during her ACS case and since she reunified with her two youngest children last year. She also shares her message to parents working to reunify their families. Lindsay will graduate from the Rise & Shine Parent Leadership Program in June.

How Rise is Working to Support Faster Family Reunification — And Shrink the Foster System

In honor of National Reunification Month, Jeanette Vega, assistant director at Rise, discusses how Rise supports reunification of families separated by the foster system, explains how this work connects to our goal of abolition and highlights Rise resources by and for parents impacted by the system. She also shares a message to parents working to reunify with their children.

‘We want policing defunded in all forms — including the family policing system’

Rise Community Coordinator Halimah Washington reflects on the March to Defund the NYPD on May 25th and parents’ calls to reverse over-investment in family policing and under-investment in communities

Here, she explains how the movement to defund the police (NYPD) and the movement to abolish family policing (ACS) have shared goals—shifting funding away from systems of policing and instead investing in communities and community-led solutions. 

Q. Who organized the march and what was its purpose? 

A. The rally … Read More

Taking Narcan Training is Taking Care of Community

I found out about the Narcan training when I was a part of a board in my community. Someone came to a meeting and asked us if we wanted to learn how to use Narcan. I said, “Yes.” I was motivated to take the training because I knew people that use drugs and I wanted to learn how to save them in case of an overdose.

We need to take care of the people in our community — because if we don’t, who will? We have to make sure our community is safe to live in. Taking the Narcan training is one way to contribute to collective care.