Posts Tagged: Surveillance

‘We want policing defunded in all forms — including the family policing system’

Rise Community Coordinator Halimah Washington reflects on the March to Defund the NYPD on May 25th and parents’ calls to reverse over-investment in family policing and under-investment in communities

Here, she explains how the movement to defund the police (NYPD) and the movement to abolish family policing (ACS) have shared goals—shifting funding away from systems of policing and instead investing in communities and community-led solutions. 

Q. Who organized the march and what was its purpose? 

A. The rally … Read More

The Problems with “The Tool We Have”

Throughout our 2019 series Surveillance Isn’t Safety, Rise described how over-reporting, investigations and monitoring by child protective services (CPS) harm families and weaken communities impacted by systemic racism and under-investment. Struggling families face investigations by punitive child welfare agencies with the power to take their children — but not the ability to address societal inequities at the root of so many family challenges.

Here, Kelley Fong explains her research finding that often professionals make reports to CPS to “rehabilitate” families. In most cases, the children are not in danger, but mandated reporters turn to CPS to provide resources or to pressure families to behave in ways they feel are appropriate. She also discusses research about better ways to support families without coercion and threat.

Reports are Down Overall, But Schools are Making False and Malicious Educational Neglect Reports

Due to COVID-19, children currently are not physically attending school or programs staffed by mandated reporters of suspected child abuse and neglect. Reports to child protective services have decreased significantly. Some quickly jumped to the conclusion that abuse and neglect may be going undetected and unreported.

However, parents and advocates provide another perspective and explain that the drop in calls is not necessarily the problem the media assumes. In fact, 90% of school personnel hotline calls turn out not be abuse or neglect.