Posts Tagged: Community

Community Care Networks

In envisioning collective care, Rise’s organizing team developed this definition of a Community Care Network: 

A Community Care Network is the set of people and places in your life that help you to achieve your goals and care for you during difficult times. Your Community Care Network might include people like neighbors, friends, family, faith leaders and many others. Your Community Care Network may also include places like faith-based groups, community centers, clubs, building associations, co-worker … Read More

‘Doing Activities Together Brings Us Closer and Helps Us Relax and Have Fun’

For fun, my son Aaron and I like to go to museums, playgrounds and zoos. Our favorite museum is Brooklyn Children’s Museum. There is so much to do there that even if you go a lot, you will always find something new to entertain you. Aaron loves to go in the sandbox, look at pretend animals, build in the block lab, play with colored sand and use the water table.

Sitting at home and doing nothing doesn’t seem so bad, right? You can sleep late, play on electronics all day. But that gets boring and lonely and leads to stress. I like to see Aaron happy and to see that he is social and can make friends easily. Doing these things together brings us closer and helps us relax and have fun.

Building Safety in Community Through Restorative Justice

Over the past year, Ashley Ellis, co-founder of B.R.E.A.T.H.E. Collective, trained all Rise staff on restorative justice circle keeping. Rise also interviewed Ashley about restorative justice as part of our process for developing the report, Someone to Turn To: A Vision for Creating Networks of Parent Peer Care.

Here, she discusses how restorative justice (RJ) training can support healing and prevent and address harm. She responds to the question, “How can people feel safe enough to show up and ask for support without shame or fear of punishment?”

‘We want policing defunded in all forms — including the family policing system’

Rise Community Coordinator Halimah Washington reflects on the March to Defund the NYPD on May 25th and parents’ calls to reverse over-investment in family policing and under-investment in communities

Here, she explains how the movement to defund the police (NYPD) and the movement to abolish family policing (ACS) have shared goals—shifting funding away from systems of policing and instead investing in communities and community-led solutions. 

Q. Who organized the march and what was its purpose? 

A. The rally … Read More