Posts Tagged: Building a Peer and Community Care Network

This series shares our learning about, and vision for, peer and community care to strengthen families and prevent contact with the family policing system.

Taking Narcan Training is Taking Care of Community

I found out about the Narcan training when I was a part of a board in my community. Someone came to a meeting and asked us if we wanted to learn how to use Narcan. I said, “Yes.” I was motivated to take the training because I knew people that use drugs and I wanted to learn how to save them in case of an overdose.

We need to take care of the people in our community — because if we don’t, who will? We have to make sure our community is safe to live in. Taking the Narcan training is one way to contribute to collective care.

‘Our First Priority Is Making Sure People Are OK’

Fear of the family policing system can prevent families from accessing needed resources and support. Through community-led mutual aid, community members support each other, often responding more quickly than systems and without intrusive processes or the threat of a report to ACS for not having food or resources for your family.

Here, Kelvin Taitt, co-founder of East Brooklyn Mutual Aid and a community organizer in the Ocean Hill and Brownsville areas of Brooklyn, New York, discusses how mutual aid is different from services through the system, building relationships, keeping resources in the community and supporting investment in Black-owned businesses.

Join Rise in Launching a New Parent Peer Support Model in NYC!

Rise is building a peer care network that can strengthen families while reducing contact with the family policing system. Rise seeks to do this work collaboratively in New York City in partnership with other community-led organizations, beginning with communities most impacted by ACS (Administration for Children’s Services). We hope you will join us and get involved!