Posts Tagged: Caseworkers

Meeting Parents Where They Are – Accepting my own feelings helped me accept the parents I work with

Five years ago, I was “green” in the field of child welfare. I was three weeks out of college with a BA in psychology. I was motivated to do the job of case planner because I’d always wanted to work with children. I knew there would be some interaction with parents but I didn’t think it would be too much.

The first time I met parents was probably my second day on the job. I’d heard … Read More

Fixing the Front Line – A new approach to hiring and supporting caseworkers

Nine out of 10 foster care agencies nationwide say it’s tough to find and keep caseworkers that are qualified, and a recent study in New York City, 4 out of every 10 caseworkers left the job in the first year they were hired. 

If you’re a parent who hasn’t had a good relationship with a caseworker, you may say, “Who cares if caseworkers stay or go?” But having many different caseworkers, or having an inexperienced caseworker, … Read More

Making a Connection – A moment of understanding changed my relationship with an angry father

This story is part of Rise’s series by frontline staff at foster care agencies about their experiences working with parents. 

I had been working as a case planner for about a month when I met Mr. G.

Before he walked into my office, other workers and even my supervisor told me that this father was difficult.

I’d also read up on the case and saw that in three prior court hearings he’d lashed out against the worker and his … Read More

Overwhelmed – High caseloads and paperwork make it harder to invest in human connections

This story is part of Rise’s series by frontline staff at foster care agencies about their experiences working with parents. 

I took the job of case planner because I wanted to help families, particularly parents.

I believe I have the ability to empathize with people without judging them. I grew up poor in Harlem in the 1980s. My mother received public assistance, and drug trafficking was all around in my neighborhood, so I understand that people can struggle … Read More

Safe Enough to Grow – Both parents and workers need to feel supported and accepted

This story is part of Rise’s series by frontline staff at foster care agencies about their experiences working with parents. 

I have worn many hats and held many positions at Sheltering Arms, the agency where I started in the field of child welfare. I’ve gone from intern to case planner to senior case planner to supervisor to coordinator of services for families that have reunified. What I have seen is that parents need to feel supported and … Read More