Rise Magazine

Rise magazine is written by parents who have faced the child welfare system in their own lives. Many people don’t know that the majority of children who enter foster care return home to their parents–and that most children in care wish for a lifelong relationship with their parents, whether they live with them or not. Helping parents is fundamental to helping children in foster care.

Through personal essays and reporting, parents illuminate every aspect of the child welfare experience from parents’ perspectives. Sign up for a free individual subscription or purchase print copies to hand out to parents and child welfare staff. For professionals, Rise stories offer insight that can improve how you engage and support fragile families. For parents, Rise offers information, peer support, and hope.

Rise Magazine

New Research: How Fear of CPS Harms Families

Interview with Kelley Fong, PhD candidate in Sociology and Social Policy at Harvard University, Author of “Concealment and Constraint: Child Protective Services Fears and Poor Mothers’ Institutional Engagement”.

By Keyna Franklin, Rise Parent Leader, and Careena Farmer, Rise Contributor

Throughout our series on surveillance, Rise has exposed how child welfare surveillance harms families and communities, particularly low-income communities and communities of color. Far too often, when families are struggling, the response they are met with is a … Read More

Rise Magazine

We Just Needed Support

For months before I caught my case with child protective services, I was dealing with my daughter Brianna’s behavioral issues. She was a bubbly little gymnast who liked to do cartwheels all over the place. But she was also very destructive, breaking things, hurting herself and stealing. She was 6.

A few days before the school called in the case, I met with Brianna’s teacher, parent coordinator, and guidance counselor. They told me that Brianna was interrupting class, sliding across the floor, being rude to teachers and stealing other students’ snacks.

I knew that Brianna had developmental challenges, but I didn’t know her behavior was going this far. I was shocked, and mad at my daughter.

Two days after the meeting I spanked Brianna because she started throwing things after I asked her to clean off her bed. I didn’t normally spank my children. But I was so fed up with her behavior. And I didn’t know what else to do.

On December 21, 2015, the school social worker called in the case. That started a 5-year ordeal with ACS that tore my family apart and caused many new problems.

Parent Support Resources

A Message of Support this Holiday Season

Every day can be a struggle. We all have hard times, but it’s even harder to go though the holiday season alone, especially when you have lost someone special or you are not able to spend time with your children because they are in the system.

I know from personal experience. I lost my grandmother a few days before Christmas back in 2011. I also caught my first ACS case a few days before Christmas in 2015. My kids were placed in foster care and I didn’t get to see or talk to them until after Christmas.

Here are some tips that helped me get through a difficult time.

Parenting

The Diagnosis

I didn’t want to believe that my daughter was autistic, but getting the diagnosis has helped us both

The psychologist’s waiting room was dim and cozy but my
daughter was impatient, running up and down. Several doctors came out to see
who was causing the ruckus. Finally, my daughter’s psychologist came out. She
sat quietly observing my daughter for a few minutes, jotting down notes and asking
me questions.

Finally, I blurted out, “Doctor, is my daughter delayed?”

When she said … Read More

Rise Magazine

Diplomacy and Determination – When I had a conflict with my son’s school, I was able to get what my family needed by being both respectful and strong.

My son was in several daycare centers starting when he was 6 weeks old. I checked them all out carefully and, in all of them, my son was almost always happy when I picked him up. I felt secure. My worries started when I moved him to a daycare that was close to our home. From the beginning, I was alarmed when I’d come to pick up my son. The kids were screaming and running around. Then my son started telling me daily about different kids hitting him.

There came a time when there’d been four incidents in seven days! I felt hopeless and angry. I thought of a time when a foster parent had told me that I wasn’t allowed to sit on the couch because it was only for their children, not foster children. I felt like I always felt as a child in the system: that no one cared. I felt like no one was there to support me or my child. But I also wanted to grow from being that foster child to a successful parenting adult. So that night I decided to email the director.